Newsroom: Information and meadia on deep-fried turkey and peanut oil

Press Releases

“Holiday Trends: Talking Turkey—With A Southern Accent”

Alexandria, VA, November 5, 2013

(NAPS)—An increasing number of Americans are finding that a holiday tradition long popular in the South gets a warm welcome from family and friends everywhere: a succulent turkey, deep-fried in 100 percent peanut oil—the second most popular way to cook the bird.

To stick to the Southern flavor, try using the same oil to turn out hush puppies, fried okra, sweet potato fries, and veggie chips, since the flavors won’t transfer with the oil. Peanut oil can safely be reused three or four times before it needs to be replaced. Just let the oil cool
completely after use, strain it, and store in a cool place.

Peanut oil has a high smoke point and slightly nutty flavor and the whole process takes about half the time it does to roast a turkey in the oven.

The oil is also trans fat–free, cholesterol-free, low in saturated fats, and high in unsaturated fats, to benefit heart health. The American Heart Association considers peanuts a heart-healthy food and research suggests that peanut oil can even improve cholesterol levels and prevent chronic diseases such as diabetes and heart disease.
 
Visit www.turkeyfrying.net to get great fried turkey recipes created by the Culinary Institute of America, including creative ways to use your fried turkey in sandwiches and salads.  After your turkey has fried, the peanut oil can be reused to prepare side dishes or anything else on your game day menu.

Here’s a recipe to try:

Crispy and Juicy Deep-Fried Turkey
1 whole turkey
1 tablespoon of salt
1 teaspoon of black pepper
1 teaspoon of garlic powder
2 tablespoons of your
favorite dry rub
3 to 4 gallons of 100% peanut
oil (just enough to cover
the turkey)

Directions:
1. Wash bird inside and out and allow it to drain.
2. Rub turkey with the salt, pepper, garlic and dry rub.
3. Allow turkey to sit at room temperature for 1 hour or until completely thawed and dry.
4. Preheat peanut oil in an outdoor or countertop turkey fryer to 350° F.
5. Make sure there is no moisture on the skin and carefully lower turkey into hot oil either in a fryer basket or using a sturdy tool inserted into the chest cavity. Submerge the turkey completely.
6. Fry turkey for 3 minutes per pound plus 5 minutes per bird. Internal temperature should reach 165° F.
7. Remove turkey from the oil and let sit 20 minutes before serving.
Makes 4 servings.

Learn More
To view recipes from celebrity chefs, instructional videos and nutritional information on deep-frying in peanut oil, visit www.turkeyfrying.net.

“Bring the Big Game Tailgate Home and Deep-Fry a Turkey!”

Alexandria, VA, January 31, 2012

Football fans are scoring high at Game Day parties this year with deep fried turkey.  Special new recipes, such as the grilled turkey and pineapple sandwich with smoked mozzarella, the Latin-style turkey tostada salad with spicy peanut dressing, and the Monte Cristo del Rio Grande sandwich, are sure to make everyone cheer.   
 
Deep-fried turkeys in peanut oil are now the second most preferred way to prepare turkey, but take much less time than a traditional roasted turkey and is very similar from a nutritional standpoint.  A 4-ounce serving of roasted turkey has 241 calories and 12 grams of fat while a 4-ounce serving of turkey deep-fried in peanut oil comes in at 253 calories and under 14 grams of fat, a very subtle difference.

Peanut oil is traditionally used to prepare a deep-fried turkey because of its great taste and high smoke point.  It is naturally trans fat-free, cholesterol free, and low in saturated fats. Many are not aware that frying in 100% peanut oil is allergen-free as well.  Peanut oil is high in unsaturated fats, especially monounsaturated fat.  It is also a source of vitamin E and phytosterols, which benefit heart-health.
 
Visit www.turkeyfrying.net to get great fried turkey recipes created by the Culinary Institute of America, including creative ways to use your fried turkey in sandwiches and salads.  After your turkey has fried, the peanut oil can be reused to prepare side dishes or anything else on your game day menu.

“TurkeyFrying.net Spotlights Hot New Thanksgiving Trend ”

Alexandria, VA, November 21, 2011

Deep-fried turkeys in peanut oil are quickly becoming more popular and are now the second most preferred way to cook turkey.  From tailgaters to pop stars, what was once a traditional southern-secret is now being celebrated by many.  
 
On the newly enhanced site, turkeyfrying.net provides turkey-lovers new recipes that were highlighted at a recent meeting at the Culinary Institute of America. These recipes included seasoned brines to marinate the bird along with interesting recipes to make use of your leftover turkey! Please visit www.turkeyfrying.net to see these recipes and superchef videos.

The cooking style is a favorite of superchefs Paula Deen and Emerile Lagasse.  This year on Thanksgiving night, ABC will air “A Very Gaga Thanksgiving” where even Lady Gaga will prepare a deep-fried turkey and waffles with chef Art Smith, Oprah Winfrey’s former personal chef who is known for his expertise in southern cooking.  Katie Couric is hosting the show.
 
Some may associate deep-fried foods with being highly unhealthy, but in the new book “Just Because You’re an American Doesn’t Mean You Have To Eat Like One!”, author Michele Jacobson takes a closer look at this deep-frying technique.  A deep-fried turkey fried in peanut oil is similar nutritionally when compared to a traditional roasted turkey in fat and calorie count. This is because the moisture in the turkey repels the oil rather than absorbing it during the deep-frying process. Due to its high temperature, the oil cannot go against the direction of the water vapor as it pushes the bubbles toward the surface so the hot oil steams the bird from the inside out.  
 
Per serving, they two types of turkey are about the same. A 4-ounce serving of roasted turkey has 241 calories and 12 grams of fat while a 4-ounce serving of turkey deep-fried in peanut oil comes in at 253 calories and under 14 grams of fat, a very subtle difference.
 
Fried turkey is traditionally prepared in 100 percent peanut oil because it naturally maintains high temperatures throughout the cooking process resulting in a bird that is crispy on the outside, moist on the inside and has a slight nutty taste.
 
Peanut oil is the preferred vehicle for frying because it is naturally trans fat-free, cholesterol free, and low in saturated fats.  A major study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition showed that 100 percent peanut oil provides the same heart healthy benefits as olive oil. Peanut oil is high in unsaturated fats, especially monounsaturated fat, and is a natural source of heart-healthy vitamin E and phytosterols.
 
The Peanut Institute is a non-profit organization dedicated to supporting nutrition research and educational programs that contribute to healthful lifestyles. For further information on this and other studies visit www.peanut-institute.org and www.turkeyfrying.net.  

Just because“Just Because You’re an American Doesn’t Mean You Have To Eat Like One!”

Michele Jacobson

November 21, 2011

 

 

 

“The Secret to Healthy Deep-Fried Turkey - Peanut Oil ”

November 23, 2010

Why not surprise your family and friends this year with new twist on an old favorite. Rather than roasting your turkey for hours in an oven, fry it in less than an hour in 100 percent peanut oil and introduce your guests to a new taste that’s been a long-time favorite in the South. The unbeatable combination of moist turkey encased in crispy, golden skin most likely will be at the top of their "best turkey eaten" list. The website www.turkeyfrying.net shows how to master this technique.

Peanut oil is the preferred product for frying because it’s naturally trans fat-free, cholesterol free, and low in saturated fats. A major study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition showed that 100 percent peanut oil provides the same heart healthy benefits as olive oil. Peanut oil is high in unsaturated fats, especially monounsaturated fat, and is a natural source of heart-healthy vitamin E and phytosterols.

According to the American Heart Association, “most of the fats you eat should be the ‘better’ fats – monounsaturated or polyunsaturated fats.” Vegetable oils such as peanut oil, as well as avocados, peanuts, seeds, and seafood are recommended sources of these fats.

Fried turkey is traditionally prepared in peanut oil because it naturally maintains high temperatures throughout the cooking process and stops the oil from absorbing into the meat. This results in a bird that’s crispy on the outside, moist on the inside and has a slight nutty taste.

Deep-frying cuts way down on cooking time as it takes about three minutes per pound, as opposed to the hours needed to roast a turkey. Professional chefs also know that peanut oil is the only oil that doesn't transfer flavors from one food to another. So you can use the same oil to cook your sweet potato fries or fritters. To view recipes, safety tips, view videos of top chefs, and other information, visit http://www.turkeyfrying.net

The Peanut Institute is a non-profit organization that supports nutrition research and develops educational programs to encourage healthful lifestyles. Learn more about peanuts and health at www.peanut-institute.org

“New TurkeyFrying.net Site Shows Peanut Oil a Key to Success ”

November 23, 2009

Read the full press release (pdf)

In the News

“Healthy Deep-Fried Turkey is not an Oxymoron ” – Business Review USA

November 25, 2010

Preparing your fried turkey in peanut oil is away to ensure a crispy outside, a moist inside, and a slightly nutty flavor. Peanut oil is trans fat-free, cholesterol free, and low in saturated fat.

Read the full story

“Calhoun County Deputies Fry Turkeys for Community ” – The Anniston Star

November 25, 2010

The Calhoun County Sherriff's office in Alabama fried turkeys for the local community on Thanksgiving. The tradition began over six years ago and is done free of charge.

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“Frying a Turkey Can Be a Tasty Thanksgiving Treat ” – The Bradenton Times

November 25, 2010

Fried turkey excites the taste buds, and more individuals are choosing this Thanksgiving turkey preparation method.

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“How to Deep Fry a Turkey (and why you'll never roast again ” – Access Atlanta

November 24, 2010

Fried turkey is better than oven roasted turkey. The flavor in fried turkey is the biggest difference. Peanut oil locks in moisture, so the meat always comes out juicy and the skin is crunchy.

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“Deep-fried Turkey Safety and Cooking Tips ” – Boston Herald

November 22, 2010

Peanut oil is considered the best oil to use when deep-frying a turkey because it burns hot and can be used many times.

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“Turkey Tutorial: Follow Our Guide for Perfect Preparation ” – Arizona Republic

November 21, 2010

When done right, deep-frying a turkey produces moist turkey with crispy skin. Peanut oil should be used when frying a turkey.

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“How to Deep Fry a Turkey ” – ABC News

November 18, 2010

Bill Weir cooks a crispy bird with a deep fryer and a dash of humor.

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“2nd Annual United Way Turkey Trot ” – WSAV TV

November 17, 2010

The 2nd Annual United Way Turkey Trot presented by Southcoast Medical Group will take place on November 25, 2010 in Savannah, GA. The United Way will be offering Cajun style fried turkey to event volunteers and participants. This is the first year fried turkey will be offered at the event.

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“Thanksgiving Throwdown Dinner: The Results ” – The State

November 17, 2010

In the Thanksgiving Throwdown poll, fried turkey won over the roasted and smoked preparation methods. Turkey frying has surged in popularity, and one in three Americans polled have eaten a fried turkey on Thanksgiving.

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“Turkey Frying is Not a New Notion ” – AL.com

November 17, 2010

Mr. Hollaway will help brush up on turkey frying basics; such as ensuring one has the right amount of peanut oil, before he provides instructions on how to properly fry a turkey.

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“Deep Fried Turkey Instructions and Tips ” – Saving Money Today

November 17, 2010

It is important to have the right equipment when frying a turkey, and picking up a turkey frying set is highly recommended. Peanut oil is considered the oil of choice, and leaves the turkey juicy and delicious.

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“Talking Turkey: Your Options for Cooking ” – Richmond Times-Dispatch

November 17, 2010

When a turkey is properly fried in peanut oil, it has great flavor and crispy skin.

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“Turkey Deep Fryers - Preparing the Bird for the Turkey Deep Fryer ” – Articlesbase.com

November 16, 2010

Important considerations when deep-frying a turkey are covered in this article. It is important to fry the turkey outside with the proper preparations. It is also important to ensure there is enough peanut oil to cook the turkey in.

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“Fry Up A Crispy and Juicy Turkey For Thanksgiving ” – WUSA9.com

November 16, 2010

A fried turkey's meat is juicy and moist.

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“Safe Turkey Frying a Hot Topic as More Home Chefs Experiment with Southern Thanksgiving Tradition ” – PR Newswire

November 15, 2010

Consumers continue to show an increased interest in fried turkey especially around the holiday season.

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“Fried Turkey Versus Grilled - Everyday Food Blog ” – MarthaStewart.com

November 15, 2010

Most fried turkey kits com with everything you will need to deep-fry a turkey. Make sure to use peanut oil, which has a high smoke-point to fry your turkey. The meat will turn out tender, moist, and the skin crisp.

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“Electric Butterball turkey fryer is safe alternative ” – WRAL.com

November 11, 2010

Consumer Reports has ranked the Masterbuilt Butterball Professional Series Indoor Electric Turkey Fryer a safe alternative to the traditional method of deep-frying a turkey outdoors.

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“Recycle Post-Thanksgiving Cooking Oil” – WDSU New Orleans

November 10, 2010

Are you wondering what to do with your leftover peanut oil after Thanksgiving? Earth911.com can help guide you to oil recycling locations around the United States.

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“Deep-fried and smoked recipes for holiday turkey ” – Access Atlanta

November 9, 2010

Don and John McLemore, partners of Masterbuilt, have recently filmed a how-to video for their Masterbuilt Butterball brand indoor electric turkey fryer. The video demonstrates how to deep-fry a turkey using a Cajun-style deep-fried turkey signature recipe.

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“Oil Alternatives: Healthy Options in Place of Canola ” – LJWorld.com

November 9, 2010

Peanut oil is a great oil to use when deep-frying a turkey because of its high smoke point. Peanut oil is also high in monounsaturated fats making it a heart-healthy option.

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“Deep-Fried Turkey: Essential Equipment And Safety Tips ” – Epicurious.com

November 4, 2010

Deep-fried turkey has several key advantages over a roasted turkey. First, cooking turkey in peanut oil seals the skin, ensuring moist, juicy meat. Second, cooking time is significantly less than its roasted counterpart. Third, it can be fun. Equipment essentials are included with suggestions of how to make deep-frying a turkey a safe and enjoyable experience.

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“Healthiest, Best Vegetable Oils: What to Buy and How to Use Them ” – AlterNet

November 2, 2010

Peanut oil is considered one of the best oils for culinary and health properties. Unrefined peanut oil has a high smoke point and great flavor. When deep-frying, semi-refined or refined peanut oil should be used.

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“Tracy Lawrence schedules fifth annual Turkey Fry ” – Tune In Music City

November 2, 2010

Country singer, Tracy Lawrence is preparing for the 5th Annual Mission Possible Turkey on Tuesday, November 23, 2010 in Nashville, Tennessee to raise funds for the Nashville Rescue Mission. Lawrence estimates that 500 turkeys will be fried. The event is free and is open to the public.

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“5 Tasty Ways to Cook a Turkey ” – The Stir

November 1, 2010

Deep-frying a turkey for Thanksgiving will ensure you have a moist meat for your holiday meal. The deep-frying method is highly recommended if you want to avoid dry meat at all costs.

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“Safer Turkey Frying ” – Consumer Reports

November 2010

Consumer Reports has a video showing how to use the Masterbuilt Butterball electric turkey fryer. The video shows the proper way to use the electric fryer and offers safety instructions.

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“Tradition May Dictate Where You Dine This Year, But Don't Expect The Same ol' Thanksgiving Menu ” – Benzinga.com

October 13, 2010

A recent survey of 1,500 home chefs has found that deep-frying a turkey is at the top of the must try list. One in three Americans has reported they have eaten a deep-fried turkey, and 58% have stated that it is better than the traditional roasted turkey.

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“Dig in! 10 nutrition myths debunked” – MSNBC.com

December 23, 2009

The Today Show website compiled this exciting list, including debunking the myth that all fried foods are bad for you! Bring on the deep-fried turkey!

Myth No. 6: Fried foods are always too fatty.
Truth: Healthy deep-fried food is not an oxymoron.


We did a lot of research in our test kitchen to prove that, done right, fried foods are nutritionally fine. Here’s how frying works:
When food is exposed to hot oil, the moisture inside boils and pushes from the interior to the surface and then out into the oil. As moisture leaves, it creates a barrier, minimizing oil absorption into the food — when the frying is done right. Meanwhile, the little oil that does penetrate the food’s surface forms a crisp, tasty crust. To keep foods from soaking up oil (and calories), fry according to recipe instructions. For most foods, 375°F is optimal. Oil temperatures that are too low will increase fat absorption. When we added tempura-coated veggies to cooler-than-optimal oil, the result was greasy and inedible — they absorbed more than 1 cup of oil instead of 1⁄3 cup. Also, overcooked food will soak up oil.

Keep in mind that we’re not giving fast-food fried chicken dinners with French fries a passing grade. Such a meal contains an entire day’s worth of calories and sodium, thanks to large portion sizes, excessive breading, and globs of sauces. But in the hands of a careful home cook, a delicately breaded and fried catfish fillet with a few hush puppies can be a perfectly reasonable — and delicious — dinner.

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“Turkey a different way” – Herald-Palladium, Southwest Michigan

December 23, 2009

This article discusses how turkey is a popular dish to serve for a holiday meal, but creative cooks might consider frying their turkeys rather than roasting. One restauranteur notes that peanut oil should be used in frying a turkey as it can be heated to a high enough temperature to seal in the flavors.

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“Indoor Fryer: Just in Time” – jpmagazine.com

December 21, 2009

This blog discusses how an indoor fryer might be a great holiday gift idea (In fact turkeyfrying.net is giving one away! Visit out blog to sign up!). It's a great gift and it gurantees you a delicious holiday turkey.

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“For Success on the Festival of Oil, Fry, Fry again” – The Wisconsin Jewish Chronicle

November 30, 2009
By Linda Morel

In this article the author discusses her tradition of deep-frying a turkey for Chanukah and how it leaves the turkey moist on the inside and crisp on the outside. She also point out how most recommend peanut oil as “it imparts the most marvelous flavor.”

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“Boonsboro Church Provides a feast” – The Herald-Mail

November 26, 2009
By Heather Keels

This year Boonsboro Bible Church in Boonsboro, MD served a free community Thanksgiving dinner including deep-fried turkey. Outside the church, volunteers were busy deep-frying turkeys in peanut oil.

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“Ten Best Ways to Cook a Thanksgiving Turkey” –

November 25, 2009
By Keith Barber

Deep-fried turkey in peanut oil makes YES! Weekly's 10 best ways to cook a turkey. Food Network TV chef Paula Deen suggests using her house seasoning (salt, pepper and garlic powder), to rub onto bird, then following with your favorite dry rub before letting the bird sit and reach room temperature. Next comes the big dip into very hot peanut oil, which can easily be combustible if you’re not careful.

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“Frying worth trying for a twist on turkey” – Shreveporttimes.com

November 25, 2009

If you want to shorten your turkey cooking time this year, you might consider frying it. You might immediately think that a fried turkey is unhealthy, but properly cooked , a 17-lb. fried turkey absorbs less than a half cup of oil. Peanut oil is good to use for its high smoking point and is the most popular due to its abundant flavor.

Read the full story (pdf)

“Tips for successfully frying or smoking a turkey” – Nevada Daily Mail

November 24, 2009

“Peanut oil is usually the preferred oil for this process because it does well at high temperatures,” said Tammy Roberts of the University of Missouri Extension Center. This article provides tips for frying the turkey so you can leave your oven open for cooking other dishes.

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still shot from clip of CBS Morning Show deep-frying a turkey

“Deep Fried Turkey” – CBS News

November 23, 2009

Jive Turkey restaurant owner Aricka Westbrooks spoke to Harry Smith about deep frying rather than traditional roasting a turkey to serve during the Thanksgiving holiday.




View the full video

“Atypical Thanksgiving Turkey Recipes” – CBS News

November 23, 2009

Aricka Westbroks, owner of Jive Turkey in Brooklyn, shared the recipe for deep-fried turkey. Jive Turkey is one of the biggest turkey-frying companies, and it delivers deep-fried turkeys all over the country. Their recipe calls for peanut oil.

Read the full story (pdf)

“Deep-frying turkey a delicious DIY project” – LJWorld.com

November 23, 2009
By Linda Cottin

This article gives you a great step-by-step process to deep-frying a turke. The writer also notes that using peanut oil is recommended because of it's high smoking point.

Read the full story (pdf)

“Deep-fried and Cajun style a Turkey Day alternative” – The Courier of Montgomery County, Houston, TX

November 20, 2009
By Brad Meyer

Spice things up and try something different this Thanksgiving! The Cajun-fried turkey, is an easier-than-expected variation that offers many benefits to those willing to try their hand at an alternative way to prepare a holiday favorite. When cooking up your cajun-fried turkey, experts recommend peanut oil for its tolerance of high temperatures

Read the full story (pdf)

“Be careful when frying your turkey” – thetowntalk.com

November 18, 2009
By LSU AgCente

Don’t have room in your oven for the turkey, dressing, sweet potatoes, casseroles and pies? Dr. Beth Reames suggests frying the turkey outside. Peanut oil is the most popular due to its abundant flavor, the LSU AgCenter nutritionist says.

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“Electric appliance eases turkey frying” – San Antonio Express-News

November 17, 2009
By Karen Haram

Karen Haram, Lifestyle Writer for the San Antonio Express-News talks about her experience with a new Indoor Turkey Fryer: “It’s best to use peanut oil for frying, both for its flavor and high smoke point.”

Read the full story

still shot from clip of Paula Deen deep-frying turkey with peanut oil

“Thanksgiving Turkey deep-frying tips from the cooking star, Paula Deen” –
Huckabee, FOX NEWS

November 16, 2009

Paula Deen spreads her southern charm on FOX NEWS’ Huckabee with Mike Huckabee. “You want to cook [your fried turkey] in peanut oil because peanut oil, y’all, has a higher resistance to heat,” says Deen. Huckabee banters with Deen about her high opinion of peanut oil to which she replies, “I just like it; it has great flavor!”



View the full video

“Teams fry for best turkey” – FloridaToday.com

November 15, 2009
By Keilani Best

Members of Brevard County Fire-Rescue in Merritt Island, FL competed in a Turkey Fry-Off challenge. Dave Hover, a member of the winning team, reveals that 100 percent peanut oil is the key to a good, fried turkey.

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“Oral Fixation: Pre-Thanksgiving Edition” – The New York Times, Blogs

November 13, 2009
By Kate Blumm

A Brooklyn, NY restaurant boosts their deliciously famous turkeys fried in 100 percent peanut oil. Owner Aricka Westbrooks notes that the nutrition of deep-fried turkey is comparable to that of regular roasted turkey.

Read the full story

“Recyle your oil for future use” – al.com

November 11, 2009
By David Holloway

The holidays have come and gone, the last turkey has been fried and now you’re wondering what to do with your leftover peanut oil. Let David Holloway of al.com guide you through some recycling options in Birmingham, AL that can easily be applied to your community.

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“What kind of oil is best?” – SentinelSource.com

November 10, 2009
By Kathleen Purvis

Kathleen Purvis of the McClatchy News Service highlights optional frying substances. She notes that fans of deep-fried turkeys favor peanut oil because of its high smoke point, lower cost and heart-healthy benefits.

Read the full story (pdf)

“Fall in Love with Fried Turkey” – NAPS

November 9, 2009

Home chefs everywhere are trying a new twist on an old favorite: deep-fried turkey. Mouth-wateringly moist, deep-fried turkey will keep guests raving long after the last bite. Authentic turkey deep-frying starts with 100% peanut oil. With a high smoke point and a pleasing flavor, 100% peanut oil seals the juices inside the crispy, golden skin which keeps the meat deliciously tender. In addition to great taste, research shows that peanut oil is as heart-healthy as olive oil and can actually improve cholesterol levels. This method cuts cooking time in half, leaving your kitchen (and your evening) open for other things. Note that deep-frying should always be done outdoors, never indoors, under a covered patio or in the garage.

Try this recipe during the holidays, at a tailgate party, or for your next family gathering.

Heavenly and Healthy Deep-Fried Turkey
One whole turkey
1 tablespoon of salt
1 teaspoon of black pepper
1 teaspoon of garlic powder
2 tablespoons of your favorite dry rub
3 to 5 gallons 100% peanut oil (just to cover the turkey)

Directions:
Wash bird inside and out, and allow to drain. Rub turkey with the salt, pepper, garlic, and dry rub. Allow to sit at room temperature for 1 hour or until completely thawed and dry. Pre-heat peanut oil outdoors in a turkey fryer or a very large stockpot to 350 degrees F. Make sure there is no moisture on the skin and carefully lower turkey into hot oil either in the fryer basket or using a sturdy tool inserted into the chest cavity. Submerge the turkey completely. Fry turkey for 3 minutes per pound plus 5 minutes per bird. Internal temperature should reach 165 degrees. Remove turkey from the oil. Let sit 20 minutes before serving. Makes 4 servings.

still shot from clip of carving deep-fried turkey

“Enjoy Your Holiday Fried Turkey” –
CBS News, Atlanta, cbsatlanta.com

November 6, 2009

“There is no better way to bring family and friends together than to deep-fry a turkey”, says John Mclemore of Masterbuilt. Here, he appears on CBS News Atlanta to show you how succulent and juicy your holiday turkey can be.




View the full video

“When it comes to specialty oils, understanding your oils is a great first step” – FoodProcessing.com

November 3, 2009

According to FoodProcessing.com, “Frying with peanut oil gives foods a rich, nutty, roasted flavor.” High in mono- and polyunsaturated fats, 100 percent peanut oil is the healthy choice for deep-frying that bird!

Read the full story (pdf)

“Preparing the Bird” – Family Circle

November 2009

This holiday issue of Family Circle will aid you in the preparation of fried turkey. Their recommendation? 100 percent peanut oil, of course!

Read the full story (pdf)

“Have fun, but play it safe, when deep frying turkey” – You Magazine

October 2009
By Veronica Hinke

Marc Denzin and Greg Sperry are pretty sure they have a foolproof formula for melt-in-your-mouth moist and tender turkey meat every time. And they usually can guarantee a gorgeous dark brown, crispy coating, too. Their secret? They deep-fry turkey in peanut oil.

Read the full story (pdf)

“Cholesterol-Lowering Diets” – FoxNews.com

September 8, 2009
By Shannon Clark

Saturated fats are what you really want to watch when trying to lower your cholesterol. Try replacing plan vegetable oil with heart-healthy peanut oil. Shannon Clark with AskMen.com gives you tips to living a healthier life.

Read the full story